After Asking One Uncomfortable Question, This Vet Immediately Knew How To Save This Dog’s Life : AWM

After Asking One Uncomfortable Question, This Vet Immediately Knew How To Save This Dog’s Life

Veterinarians often have a difficult time diagnosing their furry patients, because they can’t talk. The Vets often have to rely on information from their owners, which is often incomplete, inaccurate, or just a flat out lie. However, when it’s a life or death situation, it’s important for the pet owners to be completely honest, no matter how incriminating the answers to the questions may be.

Since President Trump established that the number of opioid use and overdoses has led us to being a nation under distress and in a national crisis, health agencies and lawmakers everywhere are working together to prevent more people from being afflicted by the horrible addiction that wrecks havoc on families.

But, there is another unexpected health agency that was recently affected by this epidemic, and it involves an innocent dog named Wallace and an animal hospital. The 7-week Shih-Tzu was rushed to Dewdney Animal Hospital in Maple Ridge, British Columbia when he was unresponsive. At first, Dr. Adrian Walton thought that the young pup may be hypoglycemic, so he administered treatment, however; Wallace’s condition didn’t change.

The doctor was stumped about what could be wrong with Wallace, but he did have one thing that could possibly cause the dog to be in such a state, and it involved asking the owner a rather uncomfortable question.

“Look, I need to know, is there any possibility that this animal had gotten into narcotics,” he asked the owner.

The owner instantly fessed up and admitted that the dog had gotten into fentanyl, which is typically used as a pain medication, however; it is the source of many overdoses that have led to the nation being in crisis.

As soon as Dr. Walton learned that the dog had been exposed to the deadly drug, he and his staff went to work administering naloxone, which is used to reverse the effects of the drug at a rapid rate.

While it was clearly a challenge for the owner to admit that he put his puppy in a situation where he was exposed to the deadly drug, it was good that he did and it allowed the staff to save the dog’s life.

Walton made sure to spread the word about being honest with vets, as it will save them…

“The owner has given permission for us to publish this post so that we can tell people to be honest when they bring their animal to the vet,” he said. “A) it can save your pets life and b) We really don’t care what you smoke, ingest or inject, we care about your pet.”

So, as we have learned from this story, the opioid crisis doesn’t just affect humans.

There was a major debate between commenters, as some accused the man of being an irresponsible pet owner and others felt that the owner may have been prescribed fentanyl for a good reason and the dog happened to get into the stash…

“He shouldn’t have a pet if he is so careless!!”

“It may not be carelessness. I was prescribed Fentanyl patches for a time and the adhesive was often very poor. The patch would often fall off without warning and I was told that putting a large adhesive band-aid over the patch would increase the rate of absorption of the medication and therefore was frowned on.”

Several assumed that the owner was a good person, considering he took Wallace to the hospital in the first place…

“Thank God you ask the owner and he was honest enough to tell the truth. I hope he cares for this little dog and realizes he should never do such a thing again. If not, give that dog to someone who will love him enough to care for him properly.”