Hunter Who Killed Animals For Fun, Learns Why You Never Murder One Of God’s Animals

Updated May 22, 2017

Most people believe there’s a special place in hell for big game hunters who kill animals for sport. In this case, one hunter found out that karma is a very real thing.

Scott van Zyl, a big-game hunting enthusiast from South Africa, provided a service for interested clients to go on hunting excursions through his company, SS Pro Safaris. People would pay to hunt animals like lions, wildebeest, and rhinos.

He was certainly no stranger to the element of danger involved with hunting wild animals. One day, however, he went missing, and locals and authorities feared the worst.

While he was skilled at the safety precautions necessary to go on such adventures, it seems his hobby caught up with him. While on safari in Zimbabwe, accompanied by a tracking guide and a pack of dogs, he and the guide separated at the Limpopo River.

Scott wasn’t seen again. According to the guide, the dogs returned to the base camp without Scott, so the guide called local authorities.

They found Scott’s footprints leading to a riverbank and his backpack. There were also two Nile crocodiles nearby.

Police suspected Scott may have been attacked and killed by the crocodiles. Wildlife authorities killed the crocs and forensics experts and nature conservation services performed an autopsy, finding human remains inside.

One commenter on this story at Honest to Paws summed it up well, writing: “When you mess with God’s animals and display his beauty like he did, your days are numbered. What comes around goes around, too bad the crocs could not display him. Instead they had to pay with their lives when all they did was what came natural.”

Another noted: “I am glad that they got him, but I am very sorry that two crocodiles had to lose their lives for someone who has killed for SPORT. I can’t believe in this day and age, killing for sport.”

Still another person commented: “A fitting end for him – live by the sword, die by the sword. I’m sorry for the crocs as they were not trophy hunting just surviving.”

One person commented: “Why were the crocodiles killed just to see if they ate this douche?  If they did attack and eat him, they were just doing what comes naturally.  The hunter, on the other hand, was needlessly killing big game.  Nature will take care of thinning out big game.  These hunters are egomaniacs with a need to prove their manhood.”

Yet another person pointed out: “It’s not a ‘sport’ unless both teams know that a game is afoot and are equally ‘armed.'”

Another commenter also tried to make sense of this “sport,” writing: “Africa are now ‘farming lions,’ raise them from cubs…grown ups send them out to be killed by wealthy. Sad…these lions trust humans…then they are shot and this is called hunting…I don’t get it….what exactly kind of rush is that…like drugs…what…what would be the danger. An animal facing a man/women with a gun…20 or more yards away…with a guide there to protect you if you miss or wound.”