ISIS Thought Their Hiding Place Was A Secret, Trump Shows Them Who’s Boss (video)

Updated December 3, 2017

Major things happen when the military is able to do the things it needs to do to get things done. In a recently released video, you can witness this as a result of President Donald Trump’s approach to sponsors of terrorism. Showing a series of airstrikes conducted by the U.S. on opium processing labs in Afghanistan on November 19, the joint operation was part of Operation Jagged Knife, which was set in motion to target drug facilities in Taliban-controlled areas of the country.

According to Pentagon Spokesman Lt. Col. Michael Andrews, the airstrikes were carried out by U.S. F-16s from Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan. In addition, B-52s were also used from Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar, a U.S. F-22 Raptor and Afghan Air Force A-29s.

Trump is certainly making it clear that he is not messing around and he is doing things much differently than his predecessor, Barack Obama, who was known for disengaging large numbers of troops from the area and preventing U.S. forces from following through with offensive airstrikes and operations.

Since Trump has been in office, some believe that the U.S. is back in business, as three times as many bombs will be dropped in Afghanistan compared to 2016 when Obama’s decisions resulted in a spike in Afghan security forces casualties who had been fighting alongside Western troops. A total of 75,000 security personnel were killed in 2015 and 2016.

And that’s not all Trump is doing.

Regardless of whether or not certain Taliban facilities pose a direct threat to the U.S. or its allies, Trump has given the go-ahead to U.S. military members, allowing them to target them.

“They fight so that they can keep profiting from narcotics trade and other criminal activities,” said U.S. Commander in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson regarding the interest in targeting narcotics operations.

According to Nicholson, the Taliban supplies 85 percent of the opium in the world.

Nicholson is accompanied by several experts when he suggests that the campaign was necessary. The Taliban has been able to sustain itself during the war due to the drug trade, as it comprises 60% of their income.

During the November 19 airstrikes, ten facilities were hit, eight of which were marked by American aircraft and two by Afghan warplanes.

And this is just the start of the strikes, as there is expected to be more in the upcoming days. Considering there are 400-500 facilities like these recently targeted, there is a lot of work to be done.

“We are not going to let up,” Nicholson vowed.

Several commenters were on board with Trump’s green light on the airstrikes. Some believe that the way to conquer the drug war is to get down to the source of it, where it all started…

“Finally the “war on drugs” is being waged where it should always have been, at the source.”

While there is a lot of criticism about Trump on both political and personal levels, there is no denying that he does get things done and makes things happen. It will be interesting to see what the future holds.