Quick Video Shows How To Fix Even The Worst Cracked Leather For Next To Nothing [watch]

Updated March 30, 2017

 

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To some, maintaining a car’s appearance is at the top of their list of priorities. They spend countless hours bathing their buggies in the warm sun and waxing until the exterior is glowing. And they won’t take their baby out for a spin until it’s in tip top shape. But, sometimes the hardest part of maintaining a vehicle is keeping up with the interior. If you have leather seats in your car, then you know how they get after years of wear and tear. They start to crack and look wrinkly much like your skin as you get older.

But, the good news is that there is a way to fix this problem. And guess what…it only takes ten minutes and it doesn’t cost a whole lot.

Because the majority of leather seats are colored, then the first thing you want to do is spend a little time searching for a spray paint that matches fairly close. You’ll also need some Lacquer Thinner and an old towel.

First of all, spray a little bit of the paint on the towel, and then pour a little bit of the Lacquer Thinner on the towel. The thinner serves a purpose and it pulls the paint in the seat up, which helps it blend with the new color that you use. This allows you to maintain the natural color and not have to change it up all that much.

You’ll then rub the towel gently along the leather, and watch as the leather gains an entirely new appearance. The cracks disappear and in their place is a shine that looks sleek and appealing. The more times you go over the leather, the more cracks you will heal. Your best bet is to let it sit for a day before going back over it with the paint/lacquer combo.

When you feel like you have reached a smoothness to your liking, then you can use your leather and plastic conditioner. The teacher in this video recommends 303 Protectant as he believes it is the best of the best. Also, one of the reasons that seats crack in the first place is when protectant isn’t used. So, it’s best to use a protectant if you want to maintain the life of your plush leather seats.

Viewers of this DIY video found this advice very beneficial…

“DIY car guy myself and never even heard of this trick, had to try it and and it really works! I thought the cracks show up still but actually they cover up pretty good 😀 Seriously good tip to anyone who wants to shine up old seats, liked for sure!”

“Just done my red leather in my 3series I was hesitant but omg soft top down let the sun shine my seats look awesome gotta climb in the back next weekend.”

“Sweet Project Cars thank you so much for sharing this! I just bought a 2000 bug with leather seats and haven’t gotten to them yet. now I can’t wait to see how they turn out.”

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