Teen Girl Who Persuaded A Boy Who Liked Her To Kill Himself Just Learned What Her Fate Will Be…

 

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When a teenager told his girlfriend that he hated his life and was considering suicide, she sent him text messages encouraging him to follow through with the act. But now the Massachusetts teen who enticed her boyfriend to kill himself won’t be getting away with her crime. The official report is in. She will stand trial for his death.

On July 1, the Supreme Judicial Court ruled that there is probably cause and plenty of evidence to indict then 17-year-old Michelle Carter for the 2014 suicide of her then 18-year-old boyfriend Conrad Roy III.

Apparently, the court ruled that the girl used a “systematic campaign of coercion” to attack Roy’s insecurities and encourage him to follow through with his final act…


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Apparently, the 18-year-old had filled his truck up with carbon monoxide then had second thoughts. He texted Carter.

In a text message, she instructed him to “get back in” the deadly truck. The court ruled that her deadly instructions were a “direct, causal link” to the young man’s death.

“In sum, we conclude that there was probable cause to show that the coercive quality of the defendant’s verbal conduct overwhelmed whatever willpower the eighteen year old victim had to cope with his depression, and that but for the defendant’s admonishments, pressure and instructions, the victim would not have gotten back into the truck and poisoned himself to death,” Justice Robert Cordy wrote on behalf of the court’s unanimous ruling.

Carter and Roy’s text message exchanges have been obtained. We are reproducing them for you below.

WARNING: These are the final messages sent before the young man’s death. They are not for the light-of-heart.

 

Carter: You can’t think about it. You just have to do it. You said you were gonna do it. Like I don’t get why you aren’t.

Roy: I don’t get it either. I don’t know.

Carter: So I guess you aren’t gonna do it then. All that for nothing. I’m just confused. Like you were so ready and determined.

Roy: I am gonna eventually. I really don’t know what I’m waiting for but I have everything lined up.

Carter: No, you’re not, Conrad. Last night was it. You kept pushing it off and you say you’ll do it, but you never do. It’s always gonna be that way if you don’t take action. You’re just making it harder on yourself by pushing it off. You just have to do it. Do you want to do it now?

 

Roy said it might be too late to kill himself since the sun was rising. He told his girlfriend that he loved her and that he was going to go back to sleep in his bed…

 

Carter: No. It’s probably the best time now because everyone is sleeping. Just go somewhere in your truck and no one is really out there right now because it’s an awkward time. If you don’t do it now you’re never gonna do it, and you can say you’ll do it tomorrow, but you probably won’t. Tonight? Love you.

 

The back and forth exchange continued. Roy continuously expressed doubt about committing suicide. He didn’t know if he wanted to do it anymore. But Carter pushed him to act.

 

Carter: You’re so hesitant because you keeping over thinking it and keep pushing it off. You just need to do it, Conrad. The more you push it off, the more it will eat at you. You’re ready and prepared. All you have to do is tum the generator on and you will be free and happy. No more pushing it off. No more waiting.

 

A few hours later at 5:08 p.m., Roy returned from the beach. He told Carter he was stressed about committing suicide.

 

Carter: You’re fine. It’s gonna be okay. You just gotta do it, babe. You can’t think about it.

Roy: Okay. Okay. I got this.

Carter congratulated him. Then she asked if he deleted the text messages. He said he had. She promised to keep sending him messages until he killed himself.

Carter: I will until you turn on the generator.

 

Soon after, Roy and Carter spoke on the phone for 43 minutes. At one point, Roy exited the truck. But then Carter coerced him back inside.

Roy’s parents found his body in the truck after they had reported him missing.

When Roy died, it had been more than a year since Carter and Roy had seen each other in person although they lived just 50 miles apart. Their 2-year-relationship was lived almost exclusively through emails and text messages.

Carter’s defense attorney, Joseph Cataldo, defended Carter citing her first amendment right to send those text messages. He also accused the deceased as being depressed and suicidal.

“At trial, it’s proof beyond a reasonable doubt, which is a much higher standard, and I’m confident that ultimately, after trial, Michelle Carter will be acquitted,” Cataldo said.

Do you think she is responsible for the 18-year-old’s death?

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