There might be no better care for people who like ooey, gooey chocolate than the earthquake cake. Also known as the upside-down German chocolate cake, this decadent dessert will get you drooling once you see and smell it comes out of the hot oven. The name that isn’t based around a geological phenomenon is actually named after Sam German, a famous baker of the earthquake cake.

German was working for a baker’s company back in 1852 when he developed this style of using sweet chocolate. Because he was accredited with its creation, they cleverly named it after him calling it German’s Chocolate Cake. While people loved the taste in the 1800s, the dessert would not become famous about a century later, in 1957.

At that time, a home cook submitted that recipe to a newspaper based out in the amazing Dallas, Texas. They loved the recipe so much it was reprinted so many times that the quality of the print became impaired. This was likely the result of why it later turned from “German’s” to “German” chocolate cake.

Ingredients to make the earthquake cake (also known as German chocolate cake).

  • 1 German chocolate cake mix
  • 3 large eggs
  • ½ cup cooking oil
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 8 oz. cream cheese
  • ½ cup butter
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 ½ cups flaked coconut
  • 1 to 1 ½ cups chopped pecans

Start by preheating your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Next, combine your water, oil, and eggs in a large mixing bowl. You can mix by hand if you desire or upgrade to a mixer like a Kitchenaid. When your ingredients are mixed, slowly pour in the German chocolate cake mix. Mix the cake mix into the wet ingredients until you start to form a batter. Keep mixing until you’ve achieved a batter that is smooth and thick.

Now it’s time to make your frosting. In a separate bowl, combine the fats – butter and cream cheese. Once they are blended together, you need to carefully incorporate the powdered sugar. Make sure to mix them together in a way that the sugar doesn’t puff into the air and float around the room.

TIP: You can add more or less powdered sugar to your frosting, depending on how sweet you want it to taste. If you do decide to use less powdered sugar, you will taste the cream cheese better.

Take a greased cake pan, thirteen by nine inches, and sprinkle coconut evenly across the bottom. Sprinkle the chopped pecans next. You can use more or less coconut or pecans to your taste. Then pour the cake batter over the topping.

Place dollops of the cream cheese frosting into the cake batter. You can add as many of these as you’d like and can use a spatula or other kitchen gadget to create a marble effect.

Bake your earthquake cake for about an hour.

The cake gets its name because the rising batter creates cracks and fissures in the cake’s surface, just like how the Earth can look after an earthquake.

Serve hot or chilled as you like.

We hope you enjoy this earthquake cake recipe.

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