You Can Now Buy “Human Cheese” Made Using Bacteria From Your Favorite Celeb’s Armpit : AWM

You Can Now Buy “Human Cheese” Made Using Bacteria From Your Favorite Celeb’s Armpit

Cheesemaking is an art. But for the people at Open Cell, a group of scientists and cheesemakers, the art form has been taken to demented heights. Now you can have “human cheese” created for you by these British cheesemakers that have been made from bacteria taken from the skin of your favorite celebrities. The bizarre cheese has been celebrated for an exhibition called “Food: Bigger Than a Plate.”

The British exhibition features many kinds of cheese “made from microbes collected from British celebrities” reported the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

Although the cheese sound revolting, they were actually created for the opposite reason. They are meant to make people more willing to try microbial foods.

The museum said that “making ‘human cheese’ is a fascinating journey into the world of microbes, from their culinary importance to the vital role they play in how our bodies work.”

Microbes are a necessary part of our lives. They help keep us healthy. You’ve probably heard about probiotics. Well, probiotics are tiny microbial bacteria that live in our digestive system that help promote overall health and wellbeing.

“Our bodies are teeming with microbes… And as scientists develop new techniques for studying microbes, the popular assumption that they are only a source of harm or embarrassment (unwanted smells) is giving way to a much more complex understanding of the extraordinary things they do for us.”

NDTV reported, “For the project, dubbed Selfmade, scientists harvested bacteria from musician and cheesemaker Alex James Blur, who chose to be recreated as Cheshire cheese, chef Heston Blumenthal (comte cheese), British rapper Professor Green (mozzarella), baker and food writer Ruby Tandoh (stilton), and Madness frontman Suggs (cheddar).”

The bizarre idea has forced the museum to go on the defensive. So many people find it absolutely revolting that they have been releasing comment after comment to defend the idea.

“As scientists develop new techniques for studying microbes, the popular assumption that they are only a source of harm or embarrassment (unwanted smells) is giving way to a much more complex understanding of the extraordinary things they do for us,” a museum spokesperson said.

One of the celebrities used to create the cheese, Rudy Tandoh, shared their experience with The Guardian about having to wait to meet their cheese “alter ego.”

“I haven’t seen my stilton yet. My cheese alter ego is, as I have been gleefully telling anyone who will listen, maturing in a dark, cool shipping container in west London, growing riper by the day. As is customary for stilton, a few weeks into its maturation, my cheese was pierced all over with a steel needle. The holes poked through the rind allow air into the cheese, fuel for happy little pockets of microbial activity, giving it that trademark sumptuous marbling of mold.”

Human cheese is certainly a bizarre topic. However, many people are extremely interested in it and what it could mean for people in the future. Will people be making cheese food items out of their own sweat?

What do you think about this bizarre food idea?

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